Say Goodbye to App Stores

Say Goodbye to App Stores

Two related items crossed my desktop today, either of which will seriously disrupt how developers use app stores to get their software to market. In the U.S., the Supreme Court agreed to weigh in on whether Apple can be sued by consumers for the markup it places on applications purchased through its​ App Store. Meanwhile, in the EU, Google is defending Android from charges that its licensing arrangements, which require device pre-loading of select Google apps, are anti-competitive. The overlap is that Google’s Android alternative is likely to mimic the closed ecosystem that has Apple under fire, and which might be open to class-action lawsuits from multiple directions.

EU Parliament Research Shows a Growing App Economy

EU Parliament Research Shows a Growing App Economy

2018 marks the ten year anniversary of the app ecosystem. In 2008 both Apple’s App Store and Google Play were launched, radically changing the way consumers interface with their devices.

​​​​​Since then, the app economy has grown significantly and at a very fast pace, as shown by the latest report on the state of play in the EU app economy, published by the European Parliamentary Research Service (EPRS) earlier this month.

EU Copyright Directive Could Have Same Global Impact as GDPR

EU Copyright Directive Could Have Same Global Impact as GDPR

Imagine if Github, a web-based platform that allows users to upload and share code, had to filter through each content upload before it was posted to ensure some part of it wasn’t already claimed by copyright holders. Imagine having to do that on your platform for each piece of public user uploaded content. That future is not far off if the European Parliament passes a copyright Directive set for a vote in mid-late June.

There Is No Privacy without Encryption, Say EU Data Protection Authorities

There Is No Privacy without Encryption, Say EU Data Protection Authorities

Interesting news out of Europe, as the EU's data protection authorities (Working Party 29) resoundingly endorsed end-to-end encryption as a “necessity" to protect personal privacy, and specifically rejected backdoors and key escrow by authorities. Score one for the people.Developers know that user trust relies on principles of Transparency, Security and Stewardship, and that there is no security without strong encryption.